Shuck this Winter Weather

Seeking shelter from the snowy streets of Philadelphia earlier this week, I found myself bellied up to the oyster bar at Oyster House on Sansom Street near Rittenhouse Square. I had been (trying) to sell wine all day, to restaurants in and around the city that have seen more than their share of slow business due to the relentless storms hitting the northeast this winter. Despite the increasingly icy sidewalks, and wet, sleet-like flakes tumbling from the night sky, Oyster House was filled with customers and bustling with activity.

I’ve been trying to get to the bottom of which types of oysters I enjoy, and which types I don’t. I usually tell myself I am going to take notes so that I remember, but that never happens.  Maybe this is similar to how you approach wine? At any rate, what I have learned is that I generally like east coast, smaller, salty, briny oysters, which is very useful in ordering and getting what I like. (See, you can try this approach with wine!).

My server helped guide me to Wellfleet (from Cape Cod, MA), Old Barney Salt (Barnegat Bay, NJ), and East Beach Blonde (Charlestown, Rhode Island) oysters and he was spot on. My favorites were the East Beach Blondes, which were crisp, fresh, smooth, and salty. Oyster House changes the list often, sometimes even twice a day, so the opportunity to try new types of oysters is boundless. These beauties didn’t need much but a squeeze of fresh lemon, but the mignonette sauce was so perfect I couldn’t help but add some before slurping away. Expertly handled by the skilled shuckers behind the bar, these oysters were completely free in their shells. I sipped a lively cremant (French sparkling wine) from Burgundy, which was the ideal accompaniment.

All of the other fresh, chilled seafood behind the oyster bar looked very tempting, but just thinking about my frosty slog back to the hotel after dinner, led me to order the smoked fish chowder. Cream be damned, this was exactly what I needed.  The chowder had just enough smoke and spice to balance out the cream. The balancing act was complete with a glass of minerally Chablis from Domaine Servin. I scraped the bowl clean and then made my way safely back to the hotel, with a happy belly, and not-so-appropriate footwear.

Oyster House will absolutely become one of my go-to restaurants when I’m in Philly. If you’re looking for an easygoing atmosphere with some of the freshest seafood in town, you should check it out too.

Oyster House 
1516 Sansom St. (Center City)
Philadelphia, PA 19102
(215) 567-7683

High on High Street

IMG_0793The first stop on my latest wine road trip was to the home of the Super Bowl Champion Philadelphia Eagles. Soon after I arrived and checked in to the Kimpton Monaco, I made my way past the vendors hawking championship gear on Market Street, towards High Street on Market.

High Street on Market is part of the High Street Hospitality Group, which also owns a.kitchen+bar and Fork in Philadelphia, and High Street on Hudson in New York. I have eaten at Fork, which was excellent, and High Street on Market is Fork’s more casual cousin.  High Street is open all day, from coffee and pastries to cocktails and pasta. My memory of Fork was that everything was exceptionally flavorful, so I was ready to have my taste buds roused once again.

I ordered a glass of Folk Machine Chenin Blanc, a Loire-inspired white from Mendocino, California, from the all-American wine list while I looked over the menu. Mineral-driven, citrusy dry white wines are my jam, so this was the perfect choice to fire up my appetite. A lot of things on the menu sounded to me as if they wouldn’t go well together, so I solicited the help of my server. Once he convinced me that it was okay to eat chow-chow alongside wild boar ragu, I was ready to order.  I started with the sunchokes, a dish from the section of the menu called “snacks”.  Sunchokes are one of those things that call to me from any restaurant menu. A root vegetable from the sunflower family, they have an umami flavor and a crunchy bite. These came roasted, with a texture that reminded me of eggplant, with slices of crisp, raw sunchoke mingled in.  Delicious.

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Clockwise: Crispy Broccoli, Pasta with Wild Boar Ragu, Sunchokes

My selection from the “plates” part of the menu arrived with my sunchokes. I chose the Crispy Broccoli with Chow-Chow and Scallion. The dish arrived looking like a giant tempura chia tree but the combination of flavors was so addicting that it was difficult to put my fork down. Chow-chow is a sort of fermented relish and it balanced out the lightly fried crunchiness of the broccoli very well. I took a break from my broccoli to order a glass of red wine in anticipation of my pasta course. This time I chose a spicy Cabernet Franc, in keeping with the Loire-inspired theme, from Ravines winery in the Finger Lakes, NY.

My pasta dish was Burnt Grains Campanelle, which is a bell-shaped pasta made from burnt wheat. The nutty-flavored pasta was dressed in wild boar ragu and parmesan. The dish was really rich, perfectly seasoned, and ridiculously flavorful. I overheard the ladies next to me talking about how their pastas had more flavor than most pastas. If I had heard that at any other time, I may have rolled my eyes, but as I dug in to my Campanelle, I knew exactly what they meant.

You may have noticed that I don’t have much of a sweet tooth so I didn’t even deign to look at the dessert menu. Instead I finished my glass of wine and took the long way back to the hotel, to walk off my very filling but heavenly tasting meal.

High Street On Market

308 Market Street Philadelphia, PA 19106
(215)625-0988